QGIS

QGIS 3 is underway – what does it mean for your plugins and scripts?

With the imminent release of QGIS 2.16, the development attention has now shifted to the next scheduled release – QGIS 3.0! If you haven’t been following the discussion surrounding this I’m going to try and summarise what exactly 3.0 means and how it will impact any scripts or plugins you’ve developed for QGIS.

qgis_icon.svgQGIS 3.0 is the first major QGIS release since 2.0 was released way back in September 2013. Since that release so much has changed in QGIS… a quick glance over the release notes for 2.14 shows that even for this single point release there’s been hundreds of changes. Despite this, for all 2.x releases the PyQGIS API has remained stable, and a plugin or script which was developed for use in QGIS 2.0 will still work in QGIS 2.16.

Version 3.0 will introduce the first PyQGIS API break since 2013. An API break like this is required to move QGIS to newer libraries such as Qt 5 and Python 3, and allows the development team the flexibility to tackle long-standing issues and limitations which cannot be fixed using the 2.x API. Unfortunately, the side effect of this API break is that the scripts and plugins which you use in QGIS 2.x will no longer work when QGIS 3.0 is released!

Numerous API breaking changes have already started to flow into QGIS, and 2.16 isn’t even yet publicly available. The best way to track these changes is to keep an eye on the “API changes” documentation.  This document describes all the changes which are flowing in which affect PyQGIS code, and describe how best they should be addressed by plugin and script maintainers. Some changes are quite trivial and easy to update code for, others are more extreme (such as changes surrounding moving to PyQt5 and Python 3) and may require significant time to adapt for.

I’d encourage all plugin and script developers to keep watching the API break documentation, and subscribe to the developers list for additional information about required changes as they are introduced.

If you’re looking for assistance or to outsource adaptation of your plugins and scripts to QGIS 3.0 – the team at North Road are ideally placed to assist! Our team includes some of the most experienced QGIS developers who are directly involved with the development of QGIS 3.0, so you can be confident knowing that your code is in good hands. Just contact us to discuss your QGIS development requirements.

You can read more about QGIS 3.0 API changes in The road to QGIS 3.0 – part 1.

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